Updates

First-ever nationwide emissions standards for power plants.
Environment Ohio In Action

In 2011, the Environmental Protection Agency moved ahead with efforts to significantly reduce mercury, soot and smog pollution from power plants. We expect these standards to save up to 46,000 lives nationwide. Together with our national coalition, we helped mobilize more than 800,000 people across the country to contact the EPA in support of safer emissions standards—no other EPA rule has ever received so much support. Environment Ohio Advocate, Julian Boggs, released our "Danger in the Air" report as part of our effort to ensure these rules were adopted.

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Sun-catching solar farm to power CMHA's new headquarters in Cleveland's Kinsman neighborhood

CLEVELAND, Ohio--TheCuyahoga Metropolitan Housing Authority is about to flip the switch on one of Ohio's largest solar farms -- an installation of 4,212 energy-generating panels on six acres of a previously vacant brownfield next to the agency's headquarters in Cleveland's Kinsman neighborhood.

CMHA officials expect the solar farm will save millions dollars on electricity over the 30-year life of the panels and they hope the cutting-edge project will burnish the image of one of the nation's largest and oldest public housing authorities.

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Report Pushes Solar Cincinnati

A Dec. 5 report is encouraging Cincinnati to become the solar energy capital of Ohio and the broader region. The report, titled “Building a Solar Cincinnati,” was put together by Environment Ohio to show the benefits and potential of Cincinnati regarding solar power.

Christian Adams, who wrote the report along with Julian Boggs, says Cincinnati is especially poised to take charge in this renewable energy front, in contrast to the rest of the state, which gets 82 percent of its electricity from coal. Adams points to the sustainability-minded city officials and public, a “budding solar business sector” and the great business environment as the city as reasons why Cincinnati could become a pivotal leader.

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News Release | Environment Ohio Research & Policy Center

New report outlines vision for how Cincinnati can become region’s solar energy leader

Cincinnati –The solar panels on top of the College Hill Rec Center are not the first to grace Cincinnati’s rooftops and a new report suggests that there may be many more to come. Standing outside the Rec Center today, Environment Ohio released a new Environment Ohio Research and Policy Center report that outlines a vision for how Cincinnati can become the region’s solar energy hub. The report – Building a Solar Cincinnati: How the Queen City can harness the sun to power its future – provides a roadmap to help put Cincinnati on track to get 10 percent of its energy from the sun.

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Report | Environment Ohio Research & Policy Center

Building a Solar Cincinnati

Cincinnati can become a solar city. By collaborating with local businesses, anchor institutions and the green community, city leaders can pave the way for a homegrown solar economy. The Cincinnati public is engaged and eager to embrace more solar power.

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Salamander threat part of ‘fracking’ water switch

State officials urged a drilling company not to take water from a Columbiana County creek for a “ fracking” operation because of fears that the action might threaten wildlife and an endangered salamander.

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